Managing multimedia assignments

I’d really like to see a panel on managing student assignments that require them to create multimedia/multimodal documents. What are some of the best ways to grade videos, audio recordings, etc.? How much technology do you teach (using Photoshop, iMovie, etc.) vs. how much do you force them to learn on their own? How do you handle video hosting – since YouTube and Vimeo have some FERPA implications? And, more simply, how do you handle the byte size of these files since students end up emailing really big files to you and to each other (my University doesn’t give much cloud storage to the students)?

I’ve got some experience with these issues, but I’d like to hear ideas and solutions from the rest of you.

Categories: Panels |
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About Ryan Hoover

Asst. Prof of English Writing & Rhetoric @ stedwards.edu

8 Responses to Managing multimedia assignments

  1. Profile photo of sallystamper sallystamper says:

    This is of great interest to me. I’ve been using group videos for both major and minor assignments and more or less winging it with regard to all these questions. My situation is further complicated because I can’t teach the technologies themselves. I make allowances in grading for level of technical ability – but overall, I’d like to bump these assignments up to the next level and to encourage more variety than just videos.

  2. B”H

    I love this idea too. I have had them using Prezi, Youtube, WordPress, and Facebook, but the grading is always difficult. I try to use a rubric, but it usually falls short.

  3. Profile photo of bboessen bboessen says:

    I’d be interested in this and could offer a potentially different perspective, since I teach students interested in working as media professionals, and students interested in just doing good (media) criticism and storytelling using media forms.

  4. I’d love to discuss this as well. Another “management” issue to discuss in tandem might be brainstorming about how to scaffold or break these assignments up into parts for students so that they can draft and workshop them.

  5. Profile photo of Dave Carroll Dave Carroll says:

    I actually just went through an educational technology course in St. Norbert’s teacher education program and a number of music courses which could have benefited from more streamlined digital resource management. I’d be happy to participate on the panel from a student’s perspective.

  6. Profile photo of marlowjm marlowjm says:

    Yes, these questions about “grading” multimedia assignments seem to mesh nicely with Kim’s focus on meeting specific liberal arts competencies that she bullet-points in her post.

  7. This sounds like a great panel to me as well. I’ve previously allowed students to complete certain projects in a media format of their choice (video, site, blog, FB page, etc.), which not only brings up the grading issue, but also how they can forge competencies in both media design and course content at the same time, without overwhelming them. I may be able to bring an additional perspective of cognitive studies to the discussion.

  8. Pingback: Digital scholarship developers | THATCamp Liberal Arts Colleges 2011

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